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Archive for July, 2009

Sky Terra Design by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, in Tokyo, Japan

July 30, 2009 By: archinhome Category: Architecture

Sky Terra is designed by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, located in Tokyo, Japan.
Sky-Terra, elevated 1,600 ft above ground, is a proposed new level for the city with plazas formed by the roofs of individual skyscraper building units joining and structurally supporting each other. This system also allows for their narrow bases and slim profiles. The building itself becomes a modular element that can be reconfigured in a variety of urban mega-structure patterns with the potential to be implemented in any existing metropolitan environment.

Sky Terra Design by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, in Tokyo, Japan 1

Each building unit consists of three elements: a core supporting vertical circulation, office space that is wrapped by structural ‘fins’, and the plaza. The fins also act as the main support structure for the plaza level. They are designed to be a continuous structure anchored to deep foundations underground for stability. The buildings are designed with floors that increase in size with the height of the building, thus maximizing the highest value office space. The core of the building has a system of elevators and additionally two separate escalators that serve only the plaza level.

Sky Terra Design by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, in Tokyo, Japan 2

The concept offers the opportunity to create city parks, or to host public buildings such as the Sky-Terra Pools & Baths and the Sky-Terra Amphitheater. The plaza level reclaims rainwater and uses it for landscaping irrigation. Every square inch of space at plaza level that is not a pathway or road is designated as landscaping creating an unconventional green oasis in a conventional urban sprawl.

Sky Terra Design by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, in Tokyo, Japan 3

Created for the eVolo 2009 competition, this conceptual design was conceived to give space for outdoor activities in conventionally hyper-dense urban locations. In the ‘micro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by neuron cells that create a symbiotic system in which each cell depends on as well as sustains another cell. In the ‘macro’ scale, Sky-Terra was inspired by the structural column system typically seen in buildings.

Sky Terra Design by Joanna Borek-Clement Architecture, in Tokyo, Japan 4

Carrasco International Airport Design by Rafael Viñoly Architects, in Montevideo, Uruguay

July 29, 2009 By: archinhome Category: Architecture

Carrasco International Airport is designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects, located in Montevideo, Uruguay.
The new terminal at Carrasco International Airport, which serves Uruguay’s capital city of Montevideo, is the firm’s first airport project and the second of Rafael Viñoly’s two buildings currently rising in his home country. Created to expand capacity and spur commercial growth and tourism in the surrounding region, the terminal is scheduled for completion in early 2009.
The design of the building emphasizes its public zones and amenities, providing these areas with an abundance of open space and natural light. Arriving travellers, for example, pass through a fully glazed mezzanine level that helps orient them to the terminal space before they descend to the baggage claim and other services. A public, landscaped terrace and a restaurant occupy the second floor, providing sweeping views of the runway and the main concourse.
Independent access roads service departures on the first floor and arrivals on the ground level. An open atrium adjacent to the street entrance opens the ground floor to the monumental space of the main hall, visually and spatially linking the beginning and ending stages of a traveller’s journey.
Key features include a curved roof which maintains a low profile on the landscape, a strategic use of daylighting and views that guide travellers through arrival/departure sequence and a design that highlights public spaces for both travellers and non-travelling friends and family.

Carrasco International Airport Design by Rafael Viñoly Architects, in Montevideo, Uruguay 1

“In Uruguay, friends and family still come to greet you at the airport or see you off,” says Rafael Viñoly, ”so this terminal provides great spaces for the people who aren’t travelling as well as those who are. The atrium, the main hall, the terrace, and the passenger concourse make this a dramatic and welcoming place for everyone.”

Carrasco International Airport Design by Rafael Viñoly Architects, in Montevideo, Uruguay 2

Carrasco International Airport Design by Rafael Viñoly Architects, in Montevideo, Uruguay 3

Carrasco International Airport Design by Rafael Viñoly Architects, in Montevideo, Uruguay 4

Mountain House Design by Morato Arquitetura, in Metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte – MG, Brazil

July 24, 2009 By: archinhome Category: Architecture, Home Design

This Mountain House is designed by Morato Arquitetura, located in Metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte – MG, Brazil.
The social areas are sheltered by glass volumes, which enable a generous interaction with the natural environment. The intimate areas are sealed by conventional brick walls torn by glass shafts. The material support was chosen according to local availability: glass, concrete, ceramics and metal pieces. The technology for the construction is related to the chosen material and to the stage of local techniques. The visual identity of the house accentuates the differences between natural and cultural orders. In this sense “what belongs to men” and “what belongs to nature” are mutually appreciated by the contrasting relationship.

Mountain House Design by Morato Arquitetura, in Metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte – MG, Brazil 1

This project was developed for a land in the mountains, in the surroundings of Nova Lima – MG. The choice of the land was determined by the extensive landscape found there. The concept of this project was to articulate volumes from transparent to opaque, according to the use of the involved ambience.

Torre Gran Costanera by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, in Santiago, Chile

July 24, 2009 By: archinhome Category: Architecture

The tower is the centrepiece of the Costanera Center, built in the central business district of Santiago. Torre Gran Costanera will contain two hypermarkets, two luxury hotels, a six floor mall with more than 200 stores and a foodcourt with a panoramic view for more than 2000 people.

Torre Gran Costanera by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, in Santiago, Chile 1

The news follows the announcement last week that another Pelli Clarke Pelli project in Austin, Texas, Museum Tower has been shelved. Construction on the 30 storey tower was scheduled for early this year with completion in 2011 but the developer has stopped the build before its commencement.

South America’s tallest tower, under construction since 2006, has been halted at 22 stories, its developers blaming the current economic climate. Designed by the same architects responsible for the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur and the iconic One Canada Square tower in London’s Canary Wharf, Pelli Clarke Pelli, the 60 storey tower was due to complete in 2010 and stand at 300m. At that height it would be the tallest building on the continent and the second tallest in the southern hemisphere.

Hörsaalzentrum Auditorium Complex Design by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in Aachen, Germany

July 22, 2009 By: archinhome Category: Architecture

This Hörsaalzentrum Auditorium Complex is designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, located in Aachen, Germany
Located on a block within the campus, the four storey complex is conceived as a singular sculptural object, breaking with the block structure by pulling back from the adjacent line of buildings. Two existing buildings on the block will be demolished in ten years time to create a new landscaped plaza with reflecting pools and greenery, increasing the visibility and enhancing the setting of the distinctive auditorium building.

Hörsaalzentrum Auditorium Complex Design by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in Aachen, Germany 1

The complex has seven entrances to make it accessible from all sides of the campus with main entrances directly into the atrium on the north side and into the facade facing the plaza to the east.

Hörsaalzentrum Auditorium Complex Design by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in Aachen, Germany 2

The project is part of RWTH’s major development strategy, which will add 280,000 sq m of new accommodation to the campus in the next nine years to create one of the largest research landscapes in Europe. The new auditorium complex will be located at the epicentre of three of the six parts of the campus; the Central Campus, the Sports Campus and the West Campus.

Hörsaalzentrum Auditorium Complex Design by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in Aachen, Germany 3

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